Novelty characteristic

What Do iPads Support for Students in Phase III

As discussed many, many times, the strategies for CVI must match the assessment results using the CVI Range (Roman-Lantzy 2007). We never can just randomly apply a strategy because it will not fit the functional visual needs of the child. If it does not fit the functional visual needs, it will not provide visual access and will not foster improvement of cognitive and visual skills.

With that reminder, I was asked about ideas for iPad apps for children in Phase III (Roman-Lantzy). Just providing a student with an iPad does not guarantee access. We need to assess the child, think about their visual needs and carefully use the iPad as a tool to provide that access.

What can be some general needs for students in Phase III?

Color: The student might benefit from color highlighting to draw visual attention to salient features of pictures and text. (Roman-Lantzy)

Light: Backlighting helps foster access to materials especially in 2D (pictures and text).

Latency: There is still a need for increased time for full visual exploration and full visual understanding.

Visual Field: Lower visual fields might be affected.

Visual Novelty: Presenting novel materials might requires salient feature and comparative exploration. (Roman-Lantzy)

Complexity: Complexity affects visual understanding in objects, increased arrays, of faces, and of the sensory environment.

Distance: Near information is more accessible. Distance curiosity is not typical so distance information is missed.

 

How do we want the iPad to support the student in Phase III based on assessed need?

Color:

  • Tools for color highlighting help support salient feature discussion in pictures and text.

Light:

  • Backlighting helps with understanding and easy of access to prevent fatigue.
  • Moving to 2D: taking pictures of their items in the environment and then providing the 2D on the backlighted iPad.

Latency:

  • Provides ability to capture images and videos for longer visual access time.
  • Capturing images can be reviewed as long as needed.

Visual Field:

  • iPad placement is flexible matched to child’s best visual field.

Visual Novelty:

  • Expanded understanding: Example: Here is one kind of mouse in the book but these are all the other kinds of mice.

Complexity:

  • Enlargement: for things at distance, for small items in complexity and for literacy
  • Overall ability to use settings and apps to reduce complexity of images.
  • Studying facial expression in photographs and videos: salient language of faces matched to voice (auditory). There can be instruction about facial expressions that match the auditory information.
  • Salient feature discussion in photographs and text.
  • Increasing spacing of words and sentences to reduce complexity of array.
  • Masking: complexity reduction with tools in Photos.

Distance:

  • Videos on the iPad: to bring information about events and concepts that occur at distance: Example: We are reading about giraffes. I think about providing a child with access to where that animal might live and how they move.
  • Access to distance classroom events: Examples: learning song hand movements for circle time.
  • Community access: taking photographs of signs and environmental materials that can be explored on the backlighted, near placed iPad.
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Morning Meeting Ideas for Children in Phase I

I had a request for some morning meeting ideas for children in Phase I as measured on the CVI Range (Christine Roman-Lantzy 2007). The concepts and vocabulary around “Characteristics” and “Phases” come from Dr. Roman-Lantzy’s work.

The first place to start, of course, is to assess the child using the CVI Range. This is the only functional vision assessment for children with CVI. Understanding the child’s functional visual skills allows you to create goals and objectives and to provide across-the-day accommodations and methodologies to meet those needs.

Phase I:  Goal: Building Visual Behaviors. Providing access to use visual skills around the 10 characteristics.

The child has a favorite color and will only look at simple one colored items. (Color)

  • Materials in morning meeting must meet the color preference. This is not always red o yellow. Your assessment will tell you the preferred color. Because this child is very visually impaired, compensatory skills should also be considered. Items presented must be 3D, real objects NOT PICTURES! 3D objects will provide visual access, tactile input, olfactory input and auditory input.

Pictures are completely inaccessible for this child who is not using central vision   effectively. (Central vision is essential for children to understand any 2D materials).

The child looks at movement or shiny items but does not seem interested in stable objects. (Movement)

  • Materials in morning meeting must meet this assessed need for movement of the presented materials to foster visual use. Shiny items are considered under the Movement characteristic since the reflected light from the surface looks like movement. Movement should be gentle and slow not fast and frantic.

There is no or little reaction to visual threat or touch between the eyes. (Visual Reflexive Responses)

  • Reflexes are reflexes and cannot be taught. There are no accommodations for visual reflexes.

The child fixates briefly but likes light, ceiling fans and movement. (Light gazing and Movement)

  • To foster looking at the presented morning meeting materials, light must be controlled, limiting the child’s lightgazing.
  • Because light is important to encourage looking, light the materials that are presented or use materials that light up.
  • Because fixation is brief, the material must be presented for longer so the child has another opportunity to visually locate.

The child sees things in the peripheral fields but does not react to items in central vision positions. (Visual Fields)

  • Because peripheral fields are stronger than central visual fields, the materials must be presented off center in the best assessed lateral visual field. (The child in Phase I will have a distinct preference for one lateral visual field).
  • The lower visual fields are often not functional well into Phase III so eye level is recommended. Upper fields can also be inaccessible.
  • Make sure the “action” of morning meeting is within their best assessed visual field.

There is visual attention in near space only within 2 feet. (Distance and Complexity)

  • The child can only look at items in near space. The exact assessed distance needs to be respected and materials presented within this distance. At this Phase, this is typically within 18”-24” of the child’s eyes.
  • Give the child a copy of the material being used with other child in turn. This provides visual access for the child even when materials are being presented to other children at greater distances.

The child rarely looks to faces (Complexity).

  • Faces are very complex. This child will have difficulty looking at faces. Be mindful that the child may be attending but not able to make eye contact or even look towards your face if you are talking. Greet them with your name and tell them what you will be doing with them. Call their name before delivering a message or asking a question. Research shows that adults often do not talk as much or as long to children without eye contact. Adults should be aware of this and monitor their behavior with children.

The child sees best in uncluttered, quiet places. (Complexity)

  • Provide quieter environments
  • Create morning meetings of less children so the movement, visual complexity and auditory complexity is more controllable. There is no rule that morning meeting needs to be all the children in one morning meeting. Have several smaller meetings.
  • Provide non-complex backgrounds for all learning materials.
  • Where non-complex shirts. You are the the visual background!
  • Seat yourself in the same position as the child to see what the child sees. You will be surprised how much visual complexity you will notice and need to control.
  • Position this child solidly for best visual skill use.

The child only looks at familiar and favorite toys. (Novelty)

  • Use familiar materials.
  • Use consistent materials to build visual familiarity.
  • Predictable routines in morning meeting will support visual recognition of materials and help children predict the sequences.

The child has a long delay before they turn to look. (Latency)

  • The child will have latency for looking and latency for understanding what is seen. Using the assessment and taking data will help identify how long the child requires for visual attention, which visual field is faster and which visual field has the most sustained visual attention abilities. The material needs to be where the learning is accessible and for as long as the child requires.

 

Building Literacy Around What Children Care About

We all pick up books based on our preferences for topics.  Why should our children with CVI be any different? Parents have a wealth of information about what their children’s passions. These are the favorite and visually familiar things we should build our literacy materials around for our children.

My student is fascinated by cell phones. I grabbed a Google image of a cell phone (actual size) and chose a fairly complex book. I applied Velcro to the back of the cell phone image and to multiple places on each page.

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The book became The Ten Ladybugs and the Cell Phone.

Because my student really likes this item and had a firm visual memory for this item, his success was almost immediate. Once he could locate the cell phone picture, he could hand it to me and play with a cell phone for a minute.

With this success, I can go several places with this skill.  I can increase the complexity of the background and/or decrease the size so the cell phone becomes more symbolic (not the exact real cell phone size).

This makes learning interesting for my student and I can work toward my goals. We are both engaged and happy to work together! We move to increase and expand my student’s literacy interests based on their preferences not mine!

Literacy: Searching for a Salient Feature

My 3 year old student who is non-verbal had no interest in any literacy materials when she arrived in preschool due to ocular and cortical visual impairments.  Her preschool provided rich experience based literacy using adapted books matched to her ocular visual needs and matched to her CVI Range Assessment (Roman-Lantzy 2007). Each book had an accompanying storybox with 3D materials to support each non-complex picture.

I wanted to check visual recognition of one 2D image.  I choose the book Zoom! Zoom! Zoom! I’m Off to the Moon by Dan Yaccarino. It had a series of images of round pictures.  As a salient feature (Roman-Lantzy) I used a shiny, gold, round sticker. I presented this sticker on a white non-complex background. I knew my student loves the Itsy, Bitsy song. With hand under hand support, each time the sticker was presented we would touch the sticker together and I sang part of her favorite song.

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With her success with pointing to this one sticker, I applied the sticker in different places on each page of the Zoom! book.

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After a week, she was looking at the pages and finding the shiny sticker each time. She would lean closer to reduce the complexity, isolate her index finger, point and look at me and smile. True recognition! With the increasing interest, she really studies all the classroom adapted books and even chooses books during her free time on the mat.

“She Sees When She Wants To”

I wish I had a nickel for all the times I’ve heard this comment about children with CVI: “She sees when she wants to.” I would be a rich woman!

Looking is not a choice.  Shown any item, we with typical vision, need to look at things in our world to decide whether we want to interact with it or not. We can decide to grab it, eat it, throw it or ignore it but we must look to determine what it is first!

So why do our children with CVI seem to see some things and not others? Why do they have this inconsistent visual regard to materials in their environment?

I find my students look and look and reach most consistently with those materials that are familiar (characteristic of Novelty Roman-Lantzy). These are the materials that my students have formed a strong visual memory of. Looking at it and recognizing it are solid skills.

My student, Judy, lacks visual attention for most materials in her environment. She requires the strictest environmental controls for visual location and for sustaining her vision to most materials. Judy does love Goldfish crackers and water bottles. She can find a goldfish cracker on her tray immediately, reach to it and gobble it up. She can spy a water bottle 6 feet away, smile in recognition and cross the room to grab it. She shows no other visual recognition to any item at this 6 feet distance except light.

People who do not understand CVI or understand how important familiar materials are to children with CVI, misinterpret this as a “behavior”. They blame the child for lack of interest. Seeing this ability in the context of the CVI characteristic of Novelty (Roman-Lantzy), is the only way to interpret this ability and to expand a student’s access to the world with lateral learning.