NEI Seeks Input on Strategic Plan: Make CVI a Priority Area

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NEI Seeks Input on Strategic Plan

On November 22, 2019, the National Eye Institute (NEI) issued a Request for Information regarding its Strategic Plan, entitled 2020 Vision for the Future, with a response date of January 8, 2020. Building upon its last Plan issued in 2012, NEI seeks broad input from researchers, clinicians, patients, vision advocates, and the public regarding research needs, opportunities, and areas for emphasis in the next five years––including needs and gaps in research, health, and quality of life. NEI has proposed seven cross-cutting areas of emphasis to foster input, including Genes, Neuroscience, Immune System and the Eye, Regenerative Medicine, Data Science, Individual Quality of Life, and Public Health and Disparities Research.

Parents: share personal stories, and the stating potential impact of increased research on care, quality of life, and well-being of children with CVI.

Clinicians/Scientists: identifying gaps of knowledge such as establishing clear diagnostic assessments and understanding underlying causes, prognosis, risk factors, and development of intervention strategies. Establishing a national data base would be critical for this condition.

Teachers, Early Interventionists, & Related Staff: development of informed practices relating to intervention and (re)habilitation of individuals with CVI.  

Please use the term cerebral/cortical visual impairment (CVI) in your response. There are indeed other possible terms to consider, but it is crucial that the NEI gets as many hits for “CVI” as possible so that they consider this as a single area of focus.

Click on the following link to access NEI’s request, which includes a response section:  https://www.nei.nih.gov/form/rfi

2 comments

  1. My daughter 11 has CVI among her problems is brain fatigue – she needs to change scenery – go for a walk , jump on trampoline, ride scooter etc and will just leave. It is immediate like a claustrophobia attack. At home no problem at school she tries to fidget with something, tap her feet, hum softly stare at an object – she is told “get over it” and she gets in house detention for her behavior. How can I convince her school that she needs these breaks, she has no control – usually occur every couple of hours then she’s fine.

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