Month: September 2017

The What’s the Complexity Framework: Designing a Visually Accessible School Day for the Child with CVI

This is an online CVI related class through Perkins elearning conducted by Matt Tietjen.

October 23rd to December 10th, 2017

It provides educators with 35 ACVREPs, 35 PDPs, 35 CEs, or 3 Graduate Credits

Matt is a passionate and gifted practitioner serving students with CVI in all Phases (Roman-Lantzy). He recently developed this framework to help teachers, TVIs, therapists and parents assess the complexity of visual presentations, learning activities and learning environments for students with CVI. I signed up to learn more about this important new tool for my work with students.

Here it the description:

“We will study the characteristic “Difficulty with Visual Complexity” in-depth, explore its central relationship to the other characteristics, and examine the ways in which it can impact behavior and access to education for a child with CVI. Our study of visual complexity will integrate the literature on cortical and cerebral visual impairment.

Participants will learn how to use The What’s the Complexity Framework in order to evaluate the complexity of school environments, tasks and materials and to guide educational teams in creating more visually accessible, appropriate learning activities for children with CVI.

In addition to learning how to rate the complexity level of a particular environment or education task, we will also emphasize the importance of balancing the complexity of the environment and task in each activity, managing cumulative complexity and visual fatigue throughout the school day, assessing interpretation of two-dimensional images, and providing direct instruction in salient features.”

http://www.perkinselearning.org/earn-credits/online-class/cvi-complexity

Color Highlighted Drum for Increased Accuracy

One of my student was having trouble hitting the Paddle Drum with any accuracy. My husband created a red lighted dot in the middle of the paddle with a bright LED light. It worked wonders! The lighted area drew visual attention to the middle of the drum surface and the student could more accurately find and hit the right area. Success was immediate!

         

My husband placed a metal crosspiece across the back of the drum on the outside ring support and placed the LED onto that with a battery pack. It has an on and off switch for ease. Having the structure off the drum surface did not interfere with the created sound. The lighted drum picture example did not transfer so well. In real life, it is a very bright red dot not the white dot in the picture here.

Rebecca Davis: Parent blog

Please check out the latest parent blog: CVI Momifesto at

https://cvimomifesto.com/?wref=bif

The subtext of the blog is “Building a Community of Parents of Children with CVI”

Historically, it is the work of parents, organizing and advocating that causes changes in the service to children. I think of the work of parents of children with autism as they organized and advocated for better research, better identification, better funding and more paid services for their children. The parents of children affected with RETT syndrome and related disorders are another wonderful model group for parent advocacy. They came together to advocate for awareness of RETT syndrome, RETT research and funding and they created assessment centers all over the country to serve their children.

Parents with children affected by CVI need to do the same. They need to come together with one voice that will bring the topic of CVI to the forefront. I monitor many Facebook pages that parents have created. They share heartbreaking stories of navigating the misinformation from medical professionals and educators as they seek the best services for their child.

The information about CVI is now decades old and building everyday. Why does it fall on the shoulders of parents with the least free time to organize this effort to help medical professionals and educator understand CVI and how CVI affects learning?  Professionals who understand CVI are out there but they are not sitting at your child’s IEP. That is where the advocacy must begin.

As parents and professionals who understand CVI, let’s begin to build the documented evidence for the IEP process that fosters the diagnosis of CVI. Let’s make sure the students are assessed using the correct tools that consider the known brain based visual issues of CVI. Let’s make sure there is not “vision time” but consideration of visual needs around the day and across the curriculum.

Check out Rebecca’s blog!