Month: May 2017

“Duckness: How Do We Know?

Look at this series of pictures. (From American Printing House for the Blind website)

How can very young children with intact visual skills understand that these are all ducks?

They understand “Duckness”.

They have a keen understanding of the salient features (Roman-Lantzy literacy) that make up this “Duckness” because of shared visual experiences with others and with access to pictures, TV and movies that feature ducks. This develops effortlessly for children with intact visual skills.  Without direct instruction, they understand that real ducks are different sizes, colors, and ages. They understand that ducks can be seen in different perspectives depending on where and how they are standing. They understand that ducks can be flat in pictures. They understand that ducks can be symbolic in toys, signs, pictures, colored cartoons and in black and white drawings.

Our children with CVI lack this visual access to “duckness”. They lack the expanded and repeated knowledge about ducks. If they have seen a duck, their idea of “duckness” is limited to that one duck. Due to reduced eye contact with people and with reduced eye to object abilities, adults do not explain the shared salient features that all ducks share.

As adults serving children with CVI, we should be aware of this limited access and limited understanding that can occur in 3D and 2D. We must create opportunities to expand children’s access matched to their assessed functional visual skills measured with the CVI Range (Roman-Lantzy 2007). We must evaluate all our materials with this visual access limitation considered. We must adjust our own interactions and instructions to include salient feature, comparative language (Roman-Lantzy).

How Do You Know If You Have a CVI Competent Teacher of Students with Visual Impairments? Importance of the Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsement

How would parents, teachers and administrators know if they have a teacher of students with visual impairments (TVI) who is knowledgeable and competent to work with children with CVI? This has been huge and frustrating problem for years.

TVIs have been slow to educate themselves to serve these students with CVI effectively even when their caseloads have shifted to include many students with CVI. TVIs might attend a lecture or two and mistakenly think they have “competency” in CVI. The TVI who attends a weekend lecture about CVI, leaves with partial knowledge and few abilities to accurately assess, accurately program or to accurately create appropriate interventions for their students with CVI. They are even more dangerous than the TVI with no understanding!

Most graduate teacher training programs for teachers of students with visual impairments do not include CVI as a core competency area. Due to this, even now, new teachers of students with visual impairments leave graduate programs with little to no understanding of CVI yet take jobs in the field where 60% or more of the students have CVI!

To solve the problem of who has CVI competence and who does not have have CVI competence there is now the Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsement in place at Perkins School for the Blind: http://www.perkinselearning.org/cvi-endorsement

For this Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsement, a teacher of students with visual impairments must prove their competency for CVI. They must take a knowledge test about CVI. They must prove experience with students with CVI by providing letters of recommendation. They must prove their ability to assess 2 students seen in videos using the Christine Roman-Lantzy CVI Range. The CVI Range is the only assessment tool for CVI with reliability. (See Dr. Sandra Newcomb: Reliability of the CVI Range Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, October 2010, © 2010 AFB).

We now have a way to “check” a professional’s competence in a directory of endorsed professionals: http://www.perkinselearning.org/cvi-endorsement/specialists?field_location_taxonomize_terms_tid=All&field_name_address_country=All&page=2

I always want a competent professional to work with my students with CVI and now add this statement to my report recommendation list:

Recommendations:

Services of a Certified Teacher of Students with Visual Impairment (CTVI) who is CVI Endorsed:

John will benefit from direct and consult vision services weekly from a certified vision professional who understands CVI.  To assure this competence the TVI must be CVI Endorsed: See the Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsement http://www.perkinselearning.org/cvi-endorsement Look in the search bar to access the directory of endorsed professionals: “Search for Specialist”. This will assure that the assigned TVI understands CVI, understands the effects CVI have on John’s learning and is trained to assess CVI using the Christine Roman-Lantzy CVI Range. John will benefit from environmental and materials modifications, methodologies and accommodations to support his visual functioning around all characteristics of CVI. The TVI will help build compensatory skills throughout the curriculum and support building advocacy for John’s independent learning. Every year at change of classroom, the TVI should provide an overview of the concept of CVI and provide a detailed explanation of how CVI effects John’s visual functioning.

To find endorsed professionals, you can visit the directory of professionals that have achieved this competence. It is growing daily nationally and internationally.

 

Teachable Moment: Color Highlighting

I did this Teachable Moment for Perkins School for the Blind. It discusses some ideas of how to use color highlighting to help with visual motor skills for children with CVI.

You can find it in Perkins eLearning

http://www.perkinselearning.org/videos/teachable-moment/color-highlighting-children-cvi

Adapting Classrooms for Children with CVI

It can be a real challenge to adapt learning environments for our students with CVI. Of course, one adaptation suggestion is never the answer. The environment must match the child’s assessed functional needs around CVI. The functional visual assessment for children with CVI must be the CVI Range (Roman-Lantzy 2007). Even children in the same Phase of CVI, must have distinctly unique adaptions for their environments and for their learning. These distinct needs can only be identified with assessment of the individual child.

For a child with an ocular impairment like retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), we would never say “Oh, this child has ROP? Here are the environmental needs and the learning material needs.” We would assess functional vision to identify the unique visual needs of that individual child. Our children with CVI deserve the same respectful and accurate assessment of their functional vision. They deserve accurate environmental supports and adaptations to learning that match that assessment.

In several classrooms where I serve children, the reduction of visual and auditory complexity and controlling access to light are the most challenging environmental adaptations. The solution we have used was to create learning centers in the classroom using cubicles.

 

These cubicles were donated by a business that was renovating their offices. The donation was a free and effective environmental support for many of my students. The cubicle walls are large and sound reducing. They tend to be tall which blocks distracting light. Perfect for so many children. Call your local Chamber of Commence or contact your local Rotary Club. I’m sure businesses would be so happy to help and to see these cubicles recycled and put to good use!

Visual Experience, Experience, Experience

For science nerds like me!

“Neuroscientists Reveal How the Brain Learns to Recognize Objects”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100922121937.htm

This article comes from work being conducted at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). They are studying how humans process visual information for recognition so they can design artificial visual systems. It seems vision is such a complex process! I think parents and teacher have understood this for years!

This great article that drives home the brain’s need for repeated experience to build visual understanding. The brain must have repeated experiences with objects in different kinds of positions, perspectives, lighting, size and distance. It reminds me to provide my students with real objects in repeated, predictable routines to build familiarity. It reminds me not it only present iPad visual targets that can’t be manipulated. The child builds visual recognition from the presentation of objects in multiple positions to view multiple perspectives. If the child is not able to manipulate material themselves, we must provide that varying visual perspective.

This is a reaffirmation of the characteristic of Novelty that Dr. Christine Roman-Lantzy discusses (Roman-Lantzy CVI Range 2007)