Month: November 2016

Inservice about Peripheral Vision

Many of my students with CVI use their peripheral vision for looking. I struggled to help staff and parents understand exactly what this means as far as visual accessibility of learning materials for the child. I devised an inservice for staff and parents that simulates what kids see when they use peripheral vision. Using this, staff and parents can really live that inaccessibility.

I place people into teams of two. One person on the team is “has” CVI with only peripheral vision use. I ask them to focus on a target in the room and not turn to look at any materials their partner will present.

The other team member shows their partner with CVI three kinds of learning materials in their peripheral field:

  • A 3D object
  • Pictures from a book
  • Communication icons
  • Words in large print

I ask the peripheral vision user to tell me what they can see during each presentation. It becomes so clear that using peripheral vision, the child can only see color and vague shape.

This inservice, yet again, gives me an opportunity to talk about the child’s assessed functional vision. I have the opportunity to again stress the possibility of improvement for children with CVI. Working with accessible learning materials with environmental adaptations matched to the child’s CVI assessment, will build visual skills towards that ventral stream use that we all want for the child but for now, these kinds of learning materials are inaccessible.

The inservice provides the experience of inaccessibility.

Understanding Color in the Brain

I always find it so exciting and encouraging when brain research about the visual system continues to unwrap the great mysteries of the brain. This understanding can only move us forward in understanding CVI and in assessing whether interventions are working. I am deeply interested in why my children behave the way they do. Here is a recent article from Spectrum MIT, a publication from Massachusetts Institute of Technology: http://spectrum.mit.edu/fall-2016/color-decoder.

Non-Complex Concept/Choice Board

To reduce complexity on a concept/choice board, I used corrugated black plastic to create the board.  I used black Velcro so the Velcro would not become another item in the array. (It disappears against the black plastic).

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I wanted to be able to notice any visual behaviors so created a window. I was concerned that my eyes and face would become another item in the array. Using black screen like the kind used in window screens, I covered the peek hole. Now this board can be held up at the child’s best distance and at her eye level. I can watch exactly where she is looking and at what she is looking no matter how quickly she looks. I can reach around the board and create movement to draw her visual attention to the described item.

Version 2

This is really helping the team understand whether this child understands the visual information, the concept being discussed and or the choices being made. I can present 1, 2, 3 or 4 icons on this board depending on the child’s assessed presentation needs.